Tactical Urbanism

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Tactical urbanism (also known as urban prototyping) is the use of economical, flexible and short-term projects to prove (or disprove) a theory and advance long-term goals. In this case, safety goals.

The Harewood Neighbourhood Plan supports extending the Georgia Greenway along all of Georgia Avenue, and using traffic calming measures to increase safety and turn Georgia Avenue into a slow street.

These temporary traffic circles are made out of recycled tractor tires, and although they aren’t the prettiest, they are an economical test.

In another effort to spend efficiently, the City of Nanaimo has placed bollards on Seventh Street to create a safer and separate walking path for pedestrians.


While they are far less common than a raised sidewalk, these bollards are tall, reflective, and allow clear sightlines while marking the side of the road as it approaches the crest of the hill. Bollards aren't the best option for every area, but they do offer a number of benefits. For instance, they come with a significantly lower cost than traditional sidewalks, and they are relatively easy to install and remove. This can make it possible for the City to carry out more projects, more quickly.

And then, there's biscuits. These aren't the fluffy, flaky biscuits that pair well with a hot cup of Earl Grey, but instead are solid, yellow platforms that help create temporary boulevards on a road. Biscuits are often placed as a safety measure to curb illegal driving maneuvers. These biscuits on Wakesiah Avenue, out front of Nanaimo District Secondary School, help to mark the north and southbound lanes.

Let us know what you think about these tactical urbanism trials in the three quick polls below (use the 'next' button to cycle through them).

Tactical urbanism (also known as urban prototyping) is the use of economical, flexible and short-term projects to prove (or disprove) a theory and advance long-term goals. In this case, safety goals.

The Harewood Neighbourhood Plan supports extending the Georgia Greenway along all of Georgia Avenue, and using traffic calming measures to increase safety and turn Georgia Avenue into a slow street.

These temporary traffic circles are made out of recycled tractor tires, and although they aren’t the prettiest, they are an economical test.

In another effort to spend efficiently, the City of Nanaimo has placed bollards on Seventh Street to create a safer and separate walking path for pedestrians.


While they are far less common than a raised sidewalk, these bollards are tall, reflective, and allow clear sightlines while marking the side of the road as it approaches the crest of the hill. Bollards aren't the best option for every area, but they do offer a number of benefits. For instance, they come with a significantly lower cost than traditional sidewalks, and they are relatively easy to install and remove. This can make it possible for the City to carry out more projects, more quickly.

And then, there's biscuits. These aren't the fluffy, flaky biscuits that pair well with a hot cup of Earl Grey, but instead are solid, yellow platforms that help create temporary boulevards on a road. Biscuits are often placed as a safety measure to curb illegal driving maneuvers. These biscuits on Wakesiah Avenue, out front of Nanaimo District Secondary School, help to mark the north and southbound lanes.

Let us know what you think about these tactical urbanism trials in the three quick polls below (use the 'next' button to cycle through them).

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What do you think of temporary traffic circles as a cost-efficient way to test traffic calming in neighbourhoods?

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Page published: 23 July 2021, 13:15